Ladurée Kuwait

THE LADURÉE WORLD

DECORATION

DECORATION

LADURÉE: DECORATION AND INSPIRATION

For years we have been combining a plethora of styles with our characteristic art and ardour, two essential parts of the Ladurée lifestyle. Each of our interiors is an adventure onto itself. The architects of the Ladurée style are meticulous in their work and impressive in their range, as at ease in the 18th century as in antiquity or the times of Napoleon III. They are passionate about everything they build, paint, sew, and upholster, and each unique object they create is conceived of as a dream of sorts.

At Ladurée, food is seen as the weaver of dreams, so our interiors couldn’t be anything less than spectacular. Pompoms, braiding, gilt, moulding, silk, marble, crystal, and many other noble materials and sumptuous trimmings form part of our aesthetic, each synonymous with beauty, comfort, and above all, delicacy.

Each moment spent in one of our tearooms should be the perfect balance of visual and gustatory pleasure – what we at Ladurée call “the taste of times gone by”. Our feminine influences include Madame de Pompadour, Eugénie de Montijo and Madeleine Castaing, three incredible women whose inimitable style has consistently inspired us at Ladurée. These women represent a breath of creativity, and for many years they decorated our spaces with a timeless elegance far removed from the passing fads of contemporary fashion.

COLOURS

THE EMBLEMATIC COLOURS OF LADURÉE

GREEN

Green was the original shade chosen for the walls of the first salon on the rue Royale, founded in 1862. This basic colour, in its many variations, has symbolized Ladurée ever since, like the cherub – a pastry chef – above the entrance to the salon. Yet initially it was white that dominated the shop-front and the interior décor. Even the pastries had a milky look and were sold in snow-white boxes. The idea then was to be subtly conspicuous, and the shop’s name was painted in Gothic lettering. Once an almost military shade of khaki, the Ladurée green is softer today, watered down a little. It is more sophisticated, and at the same time more feminine. Green is not a very common colour in cakes and pastries, although pistachio, basil, and lime are all exceptions to the rule. Yet it is the dominant hue of a basket of tropical fruit whose heady scents remind us of summer, a sea breeze, and sun-warmed bougainvillea on trellised walls. It is the colour of Granny Smith apples, young grass, spring leaves. It is the colour of nature, femininity, sweetness, and hope.

PINK

A natural choice at Ladurée, the rose is the flower of passion, of timeless longing, of eternal youth. Rosewater perfumes the kitchens of Ladurée and flavours its best-loved products. Sweets tasting of rosewater speak to us of love, St. Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day. This legendary blossom with its mysterious oriental origins and inherent virtues makes us think first of the powdery sweetness of Turkish delight brought back from a journey to Istanbul. But the rose’s taste changes completely when its petals are transformed by human artifice. Enriched with a drop of juice from its blushing sister the raspberry to add a touch of tartness, the rose appears in an astonishing range of guises: the macaroon, the Saint Honoré (indeed, the rose-flavoured one is the best-selling version), the religieuse, the marshmallow, rose-petal jam, rosewater jelly, and even an enticing rose-flavoured chocolate.

BLACK & WHITE

Subtle and luminous, untouched by the hand of time, ivory is the colour of half-tones, quivering dawns, mother-of-pearl memories. It’s the colour of almond paste, white sugar icing, whipped cream, orange blossom and vanilla.

The exact opposite of white is black. Black clouds may trouble the clarity of milk-white skies, but the dark delights fashioned in the kitchens of Ladurée are the best antidote to melancholy thoughts and unhappy memories. ‘Black is the absolute non- colour,’ Andrieu goes on, ‘and we use it in patisserie to create the most wonderful contrasts.’ It’s the colour of Italian squid-ink pasta, Liquorice Allsorts, chocolate.

And now it’s the dominant hue of the new Ladurée salon in London, at Harrods. There, black defines a world of fairy-tale mirrors, upholstered sofas, walls hung with brocade, chandeliers reflected on the skin of caryatids clothed in silver leaf.

VIOLETS: GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT

At Ladurée, the violet is an ode to femininity, evoking the perfumes of the boudoir or the dressing-table of the bedchamber. It pays homage to Madame de Pompadour, Stendhal’s Romantic heroines, and face-powder by Caron. It is fragrance and flavour at once.
Yet the violet with its heady scent is a very simple flower, though one that is pretty enough to eat.
And eaten it is: it has been adopted by confectioners and lends its flavour to cakes, sweets, even cocktails.

COLOURS

THE EMBLEMATIC COLOURS OF LADURÉE

GREEN

Green was the original shade chosen for the walls of the first salon on the rue Royale, founded in 1862. This basic colour, in its many variations, has symbolized Ladurée ever since, like the cherub – a pastry chef – above the entrance to the salon. Yet initially it was white that dominated the shop-front and the interior décor. Even the pastries had a milky look and were sold in snow-white boxes. The idea then was to be subtly conspicuous, and the shop’s name was painted in Gothic lettering. Once an almost military shade of khaki, the Ladurée green is softer today, watered down a little. It is more sophisticated, and at the same time more feminine. Green is not a very common colour in cakes and pastries, although pistachio, basil, and lime are all exceptions to the rule. Yet it is the dominant hue of a basket of tropical fruit whose heady scents remind us of summer, a sea breeze, and sun-warmed bougainvillea on trellised walls. It is the colour of Granny Smith apples, young grass, spring leaves. It is the colour of nature, femininity, sweetness, and hope.

PINK

A natural choice at Ladurée, the rose is the flower of passion, of timeless longing, of eternal youth. Rosewater perfumes the kitchens of Ladurée and flavours its best-loved products. Sweets tasting of rosewater speak to us of love, St. Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day. This legendary blossom with its mysterious oriental origins and inherent virtues makes us think first of the powdery sweetness of Turkish delight brought back from a journey to Istanbul. But the rose’s taste changes completely when its petals are transformed by human artifice. Enriched with a drop of juice from its blushing sister the raspberry to add a touch of tartness, the rose appears in an astonishing range of guises: the macaroon, the Saint Honoré (indeed, the rose-flavoured one is the best-selling version), the religieuse, the marshmallow, rose-petal jam, rosewater jelly, and even an enticing rose-flavoured chocolate.

BLACK & WHITE

Subtle and luminous, untouched by the hand of time, ivory is the colour of half-tones, quivering dawns, mother-of-pearl memories. It’s the colour of almond paste, white sugar icing, whipped cream, orange blossom and vanilla.

The exact opposite of white is black. Black clouds may trouble the clarity of milk-white skies, but the dark delights fashioned in the kitchens of Ladurée are the best antidote to melancholy thoughts and unhappy memories. ‘Black is the absolute non- colour,’ Andrieu goes on, ‘and we use it in patisserie to create the most wonderful contrasts.’ It’s the colour of Italian squid-ink pasta, Liquorice Allsorts, chocolate.

And now it’s the dominant hue of the new Ladurée salon in London, at Harrods. There, black defines a world of fairy-tale mirrors, upholstered sofas, walls hung with brocade, chandeliers reflected on the skin of caryatids clothed in silver leaf.

VIOLETS: GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT

At Ladurée, the violet is an ode to femininity, evoking the perfumes of the boudoir or the dressing-table of the bedchamber. It pays homage to Madame de Pompadour, Stendhal’s Romantic heroines, and face-powder by Caron. It is fragrance and flavour at once.
Yet the violet with its heady scent is a very simple flower, though one that is pretty enough to eat.
And eaten it is: it has been adopted by confectioners and lends its flavour to cakes, sweets, even cocktails.

ARTISTS

ARTISTS

2016 Tim Burton

Tim Burton, new film, “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children”.

2016 Yuko Higuchi

Little rabbits full of love and gentleness.

2015 Emilio Pucci

Gift boxes summoning the summer ease of the Mediterranean.

2013 Palais Galliera

Paper patterns of the 19th century, that the museum possesses in quantity.

2012 Tsumori Chisato

Tsumori Chisato, Japan's most poetic, inventive fashion designer.

2010 Yazbukey

Gift box absolutely irresistible where beauty and goodness coexist in perfect harmony.

2009 Marni

Perfection and precious detail.

2008 Designers Guild

A colourful & decorative journey in Tricia Guild's world.

2005 Anna Sui

Fantasy, magic, softness and poetry are the words which best define the creations of Anna Sui.

2016 Chiara Ferragni

A very special collection adorned with The Italian fashion blogger, Chiara Ferragni's wink.

2015 Sonny Angel

A collection of “Sonny Angel” with Ladurée.

2014 Pharell Williams x Colette

Always a dream for Pharrell : Colette realized it!

2012 Lanvin

Alber Elbaz stirs our imagination, arouse our fantasises and ... develops our sugar craving.

2011 Matthew Williamson

A rich and intense pattern with bright colours.

2009 Christian Louboutin

Christian Louboutin gives us his travels treasures and turns them into little jewels.

2009 Swarovski

A box to celebrate love.

2007 Pierre Frey

Deliciously and poetically “Frey”.

2004 Christian Lacroix

Delicacy and majesty.

2016 Kerrie Hess

Three gift boxes drawn by the illustrator Kerrie Hess.

2015 Mikimoto

Romantic gift boxes for Weddings and special occasions.

2014 Nina Ricci

A macaron-like fragrance ; or a perfume-like macaron.

2012 Hello Kitty

Hello Kitty,the legendary figure known to all.

2010 John Galliano

A vintage-style sepia paper covered in lines of flowing script, as a mysterious lover pours out his heart...

2009 Mickey

Ladurée created exclusively the very first Mickey Macaron, to mark its 80th birthday!

2008 Alexis Mabille

Alexis Mabille is creating his own vision of Ladurée.

2006 Odorantes

Famous and precious flower shop of Rue Madame in Paris, Odorantes creates the "Rosanis" macaron.

2003 Chantal Thomass

Creator, epicurean and faithful friend of Ladurée.

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